Fall Dumpling Soup

November 18, 2021

This versatile soup is packed with fall vegetables, with a bright note from the seasonal apple. The fluffy dumplings are a comforting complement that make this soup filling and hearty. We used organic carnival squash for this recipe, but you can substitute with acorn squash or butternut squash — whatever you can find locally in season will be great in this soup.


ingredients:


method: 


  1. Dice the onion and saute in 1 tbsp butter. Wash and slice the ginger into rounds. Peel and chop carrots into half moons. Add carrots and ginger to the pot when the onions begin to soften. Stir together and leave to cook on medium-low.
  2. Peel and de-seed the squash. Cube into bite-sized pieces and add to the pot. Remove the stems from the kale and tear into smaller pieces, then peel and chop the apple into cubes. Mix the kale and apples into the soup.
  3. Pour 10 cups of water into the pot and stir to deglaze. Add in the thyme, freshly ground black pepper, salt, and magic umami powder. 
  4. Simmer for 10 minutes as you mix your dumplings. In a medium bowl, stir together the all purpose flour, salt, baking powder, and a pinch of magic umami powder. Stream in the whole milk, stirring well to prevent dry pockets of flour. Pour in the melted butter and incorporate, taking care not to overmix the thick batter. 
  5. Using two spoons, scoop up one spoonful of dough and gently drop the dumpling into the simmering soup. If it is reluctant, use the second spoon to move the mixture off of the first spoon. Repeat until your dumpling dough is used up.
  6. Cover the pot with a lid and simmer on low for 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, take out a test dumpling. Cut it in half to check for doneness. It should be cooked through, with no raw dough in the middle. Return and simmer 3 minutes more if not cooked through. If the dumpling is fluffy and cooked, serve and enjoy!




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